Category Archives: community based history

Shared Authority: Lowell and Avondale Estates

Reflecting on our experience over the past semester sharing authority with the interpretation of historical resources in Avondale Estates, I found many parallels in our reading, “The Lowell Experiment,” by Cathy Stanton.  Working at the Morgan Center, Stanton found that … Continue reading

Posted in Best Practices, Case Study, community based history, Discussion, heritage, Interpretive issues, living history, Public history profession, Reviews | 1 Comment

Pratt-Pullman Yard repurposed

I saw this article in Atlanta Magazine about the purchase and repurposing of one of Atlanta’s largest historic sites to a couple who hope to make it into a mixed-purpose facility with shops, restaurants, hotels, and movie studios. In light … Continue reading

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Southern Comfort Levels

This was an interesting reading.  The challenges that Richmond faced during the postindustrial era and efforts of the healing process from the Civil War and Jim Crow.  Just as some southerners had issues with the placement of the Lincoln statue … Continue reading

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Interdisciplinary Collaboration

I enjoyed the fact that Andrew Hurley’s “Beyond Preservation” discussed the merits of public archaeology and how the discipline related to public history.  As someone who comes from an archaeology background, I find that public history and public archaeology have … Continue reading

Posted in Best Practices, Book review, community based history, Preservation, Public history profession, Reviews, Urban history | Tagged | Leave a comment

I’m going to be honest. Our book this week, Beyond Preservation by Andrew Hurley, threw me for a loop. As many of you know, my main focus for the past few years has been academic history, and that comes with a collection … Continue reading

Posted in community based history, Discussion, Preservation, Public history profession, Urban history | 1 Comment

A Note on Engagement: The Flower House in Detroit

I also really enjoyed the concept of the Funeral for a Home and wanted to compare it to the Flower House installation in Detroit.  Like Mantua in Philadelphia, Detroit has a long history of population loss, disinvestment, and residential vacancies.  … Continue reading

Posted in Best Practices, Case Study, community based history, Discussion, Public history profession, Urban history | 2 Comments

Funeral For a Home

During our class discussion last week, I found the article on funeral for a home quite interesting.  As we all live in Atlanta we can see how gentrification takes place in certain neighborhoods and not others.  One doesn’t have to … Continue reading

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