Category Archives: Interpretive issues

Making of the Silence

Apologies for my random Dr. Who reference, but considering we are dealing with historical silence it seems appropriate. The above creature is known as the Silence and cause anyone who sees it to forget that it saw it or interacted … Continue reading

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Silencing the Past or Relegating Memory?

Last week, inasmuch as I was worried about the effects of Hurricane Irma on our neighbors South, and even myself in the North, I was thankful that I could focus on “the weather” and not the historic events of the … Continue reading

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Pick your silences carefully

Over the past few weeks we read Trouillot’s Silencing the Past, a book dealing with historical narrative and the absences that can manifest through intentional manipulation of that story through historical actors, archivists and historians with different racial, political and … Continue reading

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Since meeting in Avondale, I’ve been thinking a lot about our role as public historians and how we best use our resources and time in developing an interpretive plan for this city. After reading the Trouilot book, I am very … Continue reading

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Interpretive Planning

After visiting Avondale Estates, I’ve been mulling over potential planning objectives for the current semester and thinking about how they fit into an overall interpretive plan.  One aspect of “Interpretive Planning: The 5-M Model for Successful Planning Projects” by Lisa … Continue reading

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In the south, confederate statuary and historical sinage has surrounded us all of our lives. Except for those that are extremely culturally and politically active, it seemed as if no one cared. Now, all of a sudden  you have this … Continue reading

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Shared Authority Fail: Art and Interpretation on the Atlanta BeltLine

  Art on the Atlanta BeltLine: Context is Key Now in its eighth year, Art on the Atlanta BeltLine (the “largest free, temporary outdoor art exhibition in the South”) recently opened its annual fall show featuring a piece along its Westside … Continue reading

Posted in Best Practices, Case Study, community based history, Discussion, heritage, Interpretive issues, Public history profession, Race, Urban history | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments