Category Archives: Book review

Pick your silences carefully

Over the past few weeks we read Trouillot’s Silencing the Past, a book dealing with historical narrative and the absences that can manifest through intentional manipulation of that story through historical actors, archivists and historians with different racial, political and … Continue reading

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Interpretive Planning

After visiting Avondale Estates, I’ve been mulling over potential planning objectives for the current semester and thinking about how they fit into an overall interpretive plan. ¬†One aspect of “Interpretive Planning: The 5-M Model for Successful Planning Projects” by Lisa … Continue reading

Posted in Book review, community based history, Discussion, heritage, Interpretive issues, Public history profession | 1 Comment

The Haitian Revolution and the Silencing of the Past.

My thesis regarding the Haitian Revolution, stemming from my undergraduate work in history and geography more than 15 years ago at UNC Charlotte, was whether the revolution aided in ending slavery or the slave trade. As the author of the … Continue reading

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Hollywood and the Production of History

One aspect of Silencing the Past that stuck out most to me were the mentions of Hollywood’s role in the (re)production of history.

Posted in Book review, Case Study, Interpretive issues | Tagged , | 1 Comment